Tula oblast (region), Russia (Tulskaya)

The capital city of Tula oblast: Tula.

Tula region overview

Tula oblast (region) (also spelled Tulskaya) is a federal subject of Russia, part of Central Federal District. The capital city and administrative center is Tula.

Tula region has the population of 1,532,000 (2012); land area - 25,679 sq. km.

Tula oblast flag

Tula oblast flag

Tula oblast coat of arms

Tula oblast coat of arms

Tula oblast map, Russia

Tula oblast map of Russia

Tula region general facts

The climate of Tula province is of moderate continental type, with moderately cold winters and warm summers. The annual average temperature is 5 degrees Celsius above zero, in January 10 degrees C below zero, in June 20 degrees C above zero.

The region suffered greatly during the disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Radioactive sediments infected the surrounding area, which consequently became unfit for agriculture.

About half of all the coal deposits of the Moscow coal basin are located in Tula region. They are estimated as 1,500 million tons. Over 20 deposits of strontium ore with total resources of approximately 200 million tons have been found.

In the south-west there are deposits of peat. There are considerable deposits of various construction materials, especially limestone which have been prospected since the 14th-15th centuries; as well as clay, sand and gypsum. There are commercial deposits of iron ore and several fresh mineral water springs are in the area.

Tula region nature

Tula region nature view

Tula region nature view

Author: Volodin Yura

Tulskaya oblast field

Tulskaya oblast field

Author: Lev Trusov

Tula region river

Tula region river

Author: Maks Kuzmin


Tula region history

In 1380, in the south-western part of current Tula province where the river Nepryadva flows into the Don, the historical Kulikovo battle took place which was the start of liberation of the Russian lands from the Tatar-Mongol yoke. In 1503, Tula lands were joined to the Muscovite principality.

In the 16th and 17th centuries, Tula was an important fortification point for the southern boundary of the Muscovite state. The boundary line crossed the Tula lands and cities where fortresses were located.

The industrial development of the region started in the 17th century. In 1696, the blacksmith Nikita Demidov constructed the first blast-furnaces and workshops near the mouth of the river Tulitsa. They became the start of blacksmith handicraft in Tula.

Tula became one of the centers of the Russian metallurgy and metal-working. In 1712, Peter I ordered the founding of the State arms factory in Tula which produced arms for the Russian Army. On March 9, 1777, Tula gubernia was formed. At the same time the production of samovars, gingerbread and accordions was developed in Tula.

In 1855, the Malevskaya mine was put into action and since that time systematic coal mining in the Moscow coal basin began. The basin is the oldest coal mining region in Russia. Its’ deposits were found in 1722. The industrial Industry that developed was favored by the construction of the railways “Moscow-Kursk” in 1864-1868 and “Syzran-Vyazma” in 1870-1874.

In 1937, Tula oblast was formed. It was a region with developed industry and agriculture. After the World War II, the machine-building, chemical, metallurgic, and coal industries were developed and the scientific research institutions were opened.

Tula region economics

Tula region is an important industrial center. Main industries are as follows: chemical, machine-building, food, ferrous metallurgy, and power engineering. The largest and main industrial cities are Tula (499,500), Novomoskovsk (131,000), Donskoy (65,000), and Aleksin (63,000).

The transportation net of the Tula region differs greatly from the neighboring regions in its development, except for Moskovskaya oblast.

Tula region has direct lines to Moscow and the centers of Bryansk, Voronezh, Tambov, Oryol, Kursk, Kaluga, Lipetsk and Ryazan region.

The main railway lines are the “Moscow-Kharkov-Simferopol” and “Moscow-Donbas”. A speedy electric train goes back and forth between Moscow and Tula every day. It takes about 2 hours and 20 minutes to reach Tula from Moscow.

About 70% of the total area in the region are arable lands. Crops are grown on 54% of them. Agriculture is developed best of all in the southern forest steppe area.

The crops are: barley, wheat, forage, and beetroots. Cattle- and pig-breeding are also developed there. In the northern districts cattle-breeding is developed as well as forage and potatoes growing.

Also some historical, traditional industries (like firearm and samovar making) are very attractive for Tula province visitors.

Tula region views

Tula region view

Tula region view

Author: Andrey Pelenitsyn

Tula region scenery

Tula region scenery

Author: Shevchenko Oleg

Tula region abandoned church

Tula region abandoned church

Author: Kuzovkov N.


Tula region attractions

The rich history of Tula region is reflected in its’ historical monuments and museums. These are sites of ancient settlements, remnants of defense constructions, ancient Russian cities architecture, churches, ancient estates and parks are always of interest.

There are about 30 museums in the region. Tula State Arms Museum, Tula Kremlin, and Tula Samovar Museum are worth a special mention.

Yasnaya Polyana is the place where the writer Leo Tolstoy lived. He was born and spent most part of his life there. He was also buried there, in the forest at the edge of the ravine. A lot of his works were written in Yasnaya Polyana. The estate is located about 12 km from Tula city.

About 11 km to the south-west of Suvorov town, on the left bank of the river Cherepet, there is a spa resort Krainka (was founded in 1847 and called Likhvinskiye Mineral Waters).

Among the popular tourist places there are Kulikovo Field (Kulikovo battle museum), Polenovo (estate-museum of the outstanding Russian artist Polenov), and Bogoroditsk, with the well-known park of the 18th century.

Also, the system of underground ways in the Guryev stone quarries is always of great interest.

Tula oblast of Russia photos

Tula province roads

Tula province highway

Tula province highway

Author: Dmitry Grebenkov

Tula region forest road

Tula region forest road

Author: Oksana Sidorenko

Tula region winter road

Tula region winter road

Author: Sergey Baskakov


Tula region church

Tula region church

Tula region church

Author: Sergey Sergeev


Sponsored Links: