Volgograd oblast (region), Russia (Volgogradskaya)

The capital city of Volgograd oblast: Volgograd.

Volgograd region overview

Volgograd oblast (region) (also spelled Volgogradskaya) is a federal subject of the Russian Federation, part of South Federal District. The administrative center of the region is Volgograd city.

Volgograd region population - 2,583,000 (2012); land area - 112,877 sq. km.

Volgograd oblast flag

Volgograd oblast flag

Volgograd oblast coat of arms

Volgograd oblast coat of arms

Volgograd oblast map, Russia

Volgograd oblast map of Russia

Volgograd region features

Volgograd region has a favorable geographical location. The region is the main gate to the south of Russia and further to Iran, Iraq, Caucasus, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan and backwards to central Russia and Volga region.

Two main rivers of the European part of Russia - the Volga and the Don - are connected by the Volga-Don canal. With its help the following seas can be reached: the Caspian, White, Baltic, Black and Azov. The climate of the province is dry. The north-western part is located in forest steppe zone, eastern one - in half deserts zone.

Volgograd province has various natural deposits: hydrocarbon (oil and natural gas), chemical (potassium, magnesium, sodium salts, phosphorites) and cement raw for metallurgical industry, iron ore, non-ferrous and rare metals and others. There are reserves of underground water including mineral water.

The largest cities and towns of the region are Volgograd (1,019,000), Volzhsky (314,000), Kamyshin (120,000), Mikhailovka (59,000).

Volgograd region scenery

Volgograd province scenery

Volgograd province scenery

Author: A.S.Vasiliev

Volgograd region view

Volgograd region view

Author: A.S.Vasiliev

Volgograd region scenery

Volgograd region scenery

Author: Nikolay Barabanshikov


Volgograd region history

In the early 16th century, the Russian Tsar Ivan the Terrible joined the steppes of the lower Volga to the Russian state. Before it, these territories were the parts of Astrakhan and Kazan Khanates. Towns-fortresses were founded to defend south-eastern boundaries of the Russian state. The town of Tsarytsyn (Volgograd today) was one of them.

Crimean horde influenced by Turkey was a permanent threat for the southern boundaries of Russia. In 1717, Crimean and Kuban Tatars attacked the lower Volga region. It was the most powerful attack and as a result Tsarytsyn, Saratov and other cities were plundered.

There was an extremely urgent need to construct a fortification line on the territory between the Volga and the Don which was the most vulnerable to attacks of hostile tribes. Such a line 60 km long was constructed between Tsarytsyn and Panshino according to Peter’s I order in 1718-1720s.

After the construction of fortifications, the area of the lower Volga was gradually populated and the process was regulated by the government.

In 1731, over 1,000 families of Ukrainians and Cossacks from Don territories were moved there. They formed Volga Cossack army. According to 2 manifests by Catherine the Great, the foreigners were invited to settle in Russia.

In 1765, foreigners came to this region, it was for the first time in the history of this area. Foreigners had a number of privileges: they were not obliged to serve in the army and didn’t pay taxes for 30 years. As a result, 102 German colonies were formed on both banks of the Volga River.

At the same time the colony located about 28 km from Tsarytsyn was formed on the road Saratov-Astrakhan. It was named Sarepta, after the river Sarpa on which it was standing. The first settlers of this colony were the followers of Yan Gus who left Czechia because of Catholic clergy’s pursuit.

At the end of the 18th century, when Crimea and Kuban were joined to Russia the boundaries of the state were moved far into the south. Tsarytsyn fortification line and Volga Cossack army were abolished and the city lost its military importance.

The development of trade influenced rapid growth of transportation and industry. In 1868, the construction of a railway began, it linked the city with central areas of the country and later with the Baltic Sea and Riga.

Within a short period of time the city turned into a powerful juncture of railways and waterways. The merchants of Tsarytsyn called their city the Russian Chicago.

In 1880, the town of Nobel was constructed due to oil industry, later it turned into the largest at that time oil industry complex. During the Civil War, Tsarytsyn was completely destroyed.

In April 1925, it was renamed into Stalingrad. It was the time of intense industrialization of the USSR. In 1928, the construction of the first in the USSR tractor-building plant began in the northern suburb of the city.

During the World War II, the fights for the city lasted 6,5 months. As a result, the city was turned to ruins. There was not a single spared building in its central part. In 1961, the city received its present name - Volgograd.

Volgograd region views

Volgograd region road

Volgograd region road

Author: Boris Zotov

Volgograd region country road

Volgograd region country road

Author: Dorokhin Denis

Volgograd region Peter the Great

Volgograd region Peter the Great

Author: A.Kulik


Volgograd region economics

Volgograd region is one of the most industrially developed territories of Russia with the balanced economics structure: agriculture with its various branches and different industries, oil and natural gas deposits. Two large navigable rivers linked with the Volga-Don canal flows across the province. Volga hydro-power station is located on the territory of the region.

Main industries are as follows: machine-building and metal-working (tractors, ships, cranes, equipment for oil, power engineering and food industries; boring, transportation, medical and trade equipment; fuel (oil and gas extracting), oil-processing, chemical, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy. Textile, wood-processing and food industries are well developed.

Volgograd region is remarkable for grain producing as well as oil, water-melons and melons. Important railways, highways, water- and airways cross the territory of the province. The lower Volga and Don linked with the Volga-Don canal favor freight carrying from the ports of European countries to Africa and the Middle East.

The territory of the region is crossed by federal highway E119 - M6 “Moscow - Astrakhan”; highway E40 - M21 “Volgograd - Kishinyov”; road P228 “Syzran - Saratov - Volgograd”. The rivers Volga and Don are the main waterways of the region. Volgograd, Kalach-on-Don and Kamyshin are the port cities.

Volgograd oblast of Russia photos

Volgograd region churches

Volgograd province church

Volgograd province church

Author: A.S.Vasiliev

Volgograd region church

Volgograd region church

Author: Artem Naumov

Volgograd region cathedral

Volgograd region cathedral

Author: Aleksandr Tuznichenko


Volgograd region Soviet past

Volgogradskaya oblast Soviet past

Volgogradskaya oblast Soviet past

Author: A.S.Vasiliev


The questions of our visitors

ray asks: Hi. I would like to know how far the village of Log is from Volgograd, I have a friend there and I just wanted to know. Thanks
Expert's answer:
The distance between Volgograd and Log is about 108 km.

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