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Soviet anti-religious propaganda posters

Atheism, as a worldview denying religion, without being formally declared in the USSR as an element of state ideology, was actively supported by the Communist Party and state bodies until 1988.

Propaganda was actively used for these purposes. Here are examples of anti-religious posters that you could see in the times of the USSR.

1. There is no God!

religion is poison?

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Educating Readers in the USSR in 1926-1929

Propaganda in the USSR was diverse and covered almost all spheres of life. For example, the following posters educated readers how to handle books rightly. Pictures by humus.

1926. Protect the book from rain and snow.

read books rightly

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S-189 is a submarine of Project 613 moored at Lieutenant Schmidt Embankment in St. Petersburg and converted into a museum.

Project 613 submarines (according to NATO classification: “Whiskey”) are Soviet medium-sized diesel-electric submarines built in 1951-1957. This series became the most massive in the Soviet submarine fleet (215 submarines). Photos by: deletant.

The conning tower of S-189.

explore the submarine

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The second part of unique photos taken by Major Martin Manhoff, who spent more than two years in the Soviet Union in the early 1950s as an assistant to the military attache in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

The first part of the photos.

View of the Kremlin from Moskvoretskaya Embankment.

Moscow in the early 1950s

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The image of a woman in Soviet propaganda

Soviet propaganda was diverse and influenced the minds of people all the time. Let’s see how the image of a woman was used and gradually changed on Soviet posters. Source: humus

Woman! Learn to read and write!
Oh, mother! If you were literate, you could help me! (1923)

Soviet propaganda posters

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Major Martin Manhoff spent more than two years in the Soviet Union in the early 1950s. He worked as an assistant to the military attache in the U.S. Embassy, ‚Äč‚Äčlocated near Red Square.

Manhoff, being a gifted photographer, shot hundreds of scenes from everyday Soviet life – both in Moscow and in other regions of the USSR.

Construction of the hotel “Ukraina” from the roof of the U.S. Embassy on Novinsky Boulevard. On the left you can see the Church of the Nine Martyrs of Cyzicus (1954).

Moscow in the early 1950s

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Alexander Mikhailovich Rodchenko (1891-1956), a Russian graphic artist, sculptor and photographer, was a true genius of Soviet propaganda, one of the founders of constructivism, the founder of design and advertising in the USSR.

Rodchenko is probably the most famous Russian photographer, almost everybody in Russia has seen at least a couple of his photos. Let’s get acquainted with some of his works. Source: humus.

On the corner of Myasnitskaya Street in Moscow (1920s)

Soviet people, Rodchenko, photo 1

people in the early Soviet Union


In the late 1970s, after the closure of the Soviet lunar program and work on the super-heavy carrier rocket N1, the development of a new super-heavy rocket called “Energy” began.

The first launch was made in 1987, and, in 1988, the rocket put into orbit the Soviet space shuttle “Buran.” Photos by: Ralph Mirebs.

The space launch vehicle Energy-M, Baikonur, Russia, photo 1

abandoned rocket

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June 2, 2015, Baikonur Cosmodrome, the cradle of space exploration and the largest Russian spaceport, celebrated its 60th anniversary. Over the years, a lot of different space vehicles were tested on its territory, the apex of which was the system of “Energy-Buran”. But history has chosen its path and the project died in infancy.

More than two decades ago, heavy sliding doors of an assembling and filling complex were closed cutting off two orbiting spacecraft from the sky. How ironic that the birthplace of these spaceships became their burial place.

Abandoned spaceships Energy-Buran, Baikonur cosmodrome, photo 1

the remnants of the Soviet shuttles

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Color photos of Soviet people in the 1950s

In the fifties, Semyon Osipovich Friedland, Soviet photographer and journalist, made a lot of high-quality color photographs in all parts of the Soviet Union.

Thanks to his work, we can now see people’s life in the USSR after World War II. Of course these photos are staged but nevertheless quite interesting from a historical perspective.

Soviet people in the 1950s, photo 1

Soviet historical photos


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