Russia travel blog | All about Russia in English

Aug/15

4

St. Petersburg from above. Part 1

St. Petersburg, the former capital of the Russian Empire, is a unique city with its own rules of conduct. To preserve historic buildings, the legacy of the era of the Russian Empire, the construction of high-rise buildings is not permitted in the city center.

The general plan of Saint Petersburg of the 19th century has remained practically unchanged since that time. Straight streets, strict compliance with the architectural styles, all of this can be seen particularly well from above, when flying over the city in a helicopter. Photos by: Stepanov Slava.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 1

St. Petersburg was founded by the first Russian Emperor Peter I in 1703, who named the city after his patron in heaven – St. Peter the Apostle. The city is located on the coast of the Gulf of Finland at the mouth of the Neva River.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 2

St. Petersburg is the northernmost city in the world with a population of over one million people. It is not only the cultural capital of Russia, but also an important tourist center of the country.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 3

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 4

Palace (Dvortsovaya) Square – the main square of Saint-Petersburg.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 5

The Alexander Column. It was built by order of Emperor Nicholas I in 1830-1834 to commemorate the victory of his older brother Alexander I over Napoleon in 1812-1814.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 6

Winter (Zimniy) Palace (1754-1762) – the former main Russian imperial palace.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 7

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 8

Peter and Paul Fortress – the historical core of the city.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 9

Peter and Paul Cathedral – the tomb of the Russian emperors. Until 2012, the cathedral (122.5 meters) was the tallest building in St. Petersburg.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 10

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 11

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 12

The main tower of the Admiralty.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 13

Nevsky Prospect (4.5 km) – the main street of St. Petersburg.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 14

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 15

“The Bronze Horseman” – the monument to Peter the Great, the first Russian Emperor.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 16

St. Isaac’s Cathedral – the largest Orthodox church in St. Petersburg. The height of the church is 101.5 meters.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 17

The Field of Mars (Marsovo Polye) – a large park named after the Roman god of war in the center of the city.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 18

Mikhailovsky Castle – the former imperial palace, built by order of Emperor Paul I, at the turn of the 18th-19th centuries, the place where he was killed.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 19

Griboyedov Canal.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 20

Savior on Spilled Blood. The cathedral was built on the site of the assassination of Emperor Alexander II. He was mortally wounded by a bomb on March 1, 1881.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 21

Tauride Palace.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 22

Smolny Cathedral.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 23

The Moika River.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 24

The spit of Vasilyevsky Island. The building of the Exchange.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 25

Rostral column (1810)

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 26

The network of parallel streets and avenues crossing Vasilyevsky Island, the original idea was to build them as canals.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 27

Arctic icebreaker “Krasin”. Today, it is a ship-museum.

Saint Petersburg, Russia from above, photo 28

The second part.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to the RSS feed to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Tags: 

<<

>>

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply